Summary of Awards to Date

Determining the environmental factors contributing to the extended survival or regrowth of foodborne pathogens in composting systems.

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Date

May. 1, 2007 - Oct. 1, 2008

Funding Agency

Center for Produce Safety

Amount Awarded

$222,098.00

Investigator

Xiuping Jiang, Ph.D.
Clemson University

Co-Investigator(s)

Zehnder, G. and Luo, F.

Summary

This study examines the effectiveness of composting for inactivating pathogens in manure, given that raw or inadequately composted animal waste applied to growing fields is a potential pre-harvest source of produce contamination. The primary mechanism for pathogen inactivation during outdoor composting is microorganism-related heat generation. In practice, the effectiveness of pathogen inactivation varies with environmental factors, including temperature, rainfall, nutrient sources, compost ingredients, and pathogens induced heat resistance.